Showing posts with label Episcopal diocese of Virginia. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Episcopal diocese of Virginia. Show all posts

Sunday, June 28, 2020

Petition Seeking Review of Perjuring Priest Bob Malm’s Conduct Passes 16,000 Signatures

Even as six separate lawsuits against perjuring priest Bob Malm, his family, Kelly Motormouth Gable, and the Episcopal Diocese of Virginia move forward, the online petition demanding justice for those hurt by perjuring priest Bob Malm continues to garner signatures. 

Earlier today, the petition broke 16,000 signatures, and it shows no signs of slowing down.

Meanwhile, Episcopal bishop Susan Goff and the other fat cats in that fusty old heap of antebellum history, Mayo House, continue to bury their hands in the sand by refusing to deal with Bob Malm’s perjury and lies.

Somehow, it’s fitting. Mayo House, a spectacularly costly and poorly maintained relic of the past, has numerous ties to the slave trade. Yet even as Susan Goff bloviates about “the way of love,” she sees no irony in hanging out in this monument to injustice.

How appropriate.




Saturday, June 27, 2020

Litigation Update: General District Motions Court and Other Legal News



Motions court was today for the case involving the diocese, Bishop Goff, and the parish was today. The results were a mixed bag.

On the plus side, we had an extensive discussion about Bob Malm’s perjury, the diocese’s willingness to turn a blind eye to Bob Malm’s perjury and lies, and the fact that Bishop Goff and other church officials now want to argue the “sleeping beauty” defense. The church is all about welcome, inclusion, and the Way of Love—so what’s a little perjury among friends?

On the down side, Judge Haddock clearly did not understand the tort of abuse of process. In Bob Malm’s case, the key element is not Bob’s perjury. Rather, it is his attempt to use the protective order process as a strategic lawsuit against public participation, or SLAPP. That said, because it is not unusual for plaintiffs to have improper or mixed motives when bringing a lawsuit, the tort requires more — it requires a showing of an act not proper in the ordinary course of the proceedings.

In Bob’s case, the improper acts include, most notably, his perjury. In addition, they include his improper withholding of evidence harmful to his case during discovery, his misuse of process in Pennsylvania, and more.

The outcome was that the court sustained the church and diocese’s demurrer, but granted leave to amend my pleadings. That said, I don’t know that it’s worth the time and effort to further pursue things at the general district court.

In terms of next steps, my plan is to appeal to the circuit court, although I may file a motion for reconsideration in the meantime.

On other fronts, I transferred the defamation cases against Lindsey Anders and Leslie Malm to circuit court. Also, I met Bob’s attorney, Wayne Cyron, who seems like a genuinely good guy. I told him I have no objection to a change of venue in the suit against Kelly Gable, but will oppose a change of venue for the cases against Lindsey and Leslie. And I am working to finish up my pleadings for leave to amend to include Bob Malm’s defamation.

For the record, I am far from done. And in just a few weeks we’ll have the hearing in the Pennsylvania case.

Stay tuned! And when you hear Bishop Goff bloviating about the “way of love,” just remember: Perjury is okay.

Just don’t get convicted.


Monday, June 22, 2020

Petition Comments Reflect the Reputational Damage Bob Malm’s Conduct Has Caused to The Episcopal Church

Check out the recent fan mail from my petition. Despite this, Susan Goff refuses to address Bob Malm’s perjury.

Simply put, I believe it is inappropriate for Bob Malm to continue to serve as a priest. He has betrayed the trust that I and others once had in him. His conduct brings The Episcopal Church, the diocese, and Grace Episcopal Church into disrepute.


Thursday, May 28, 2020

Petition Demanding Independent Investigation of Perjuring Priest Bob Malm Passes 12,000 Signatures

Recently, our online petition seeking a full, fair, independent investigation of perjuring priest Bob Malm — and meaningful action based on the results — passed 12,000 signatures. Signatures continue to come in from around the world.

It is, of course, sad that such a petition is needed. Susan Goff and the Episcopal Diocese of Virginia have been offered numerous opportunities to deal with perjuring priest Bob Malm and his misconduct/abuse of office, but have consistently declined to do so. They have claimed repeatedly that Bob Malm’s conduct is “not of weighty and material importance to the ministry of the church,” while privately complaining about the damage this conflict is causing to the church. So why does the church think it can have it both ways?

Even more telling is the fact that Susan Goff says clergy misconduct is only actionable if it results in criminal charges. That means that sexual assault, theft, corruption — none of this is actionable unless charges are filed.

Small wonder The Episcopal Church is imploding as it wallows in its own ethical filth.







Wednesday, May 13, 2020

Shrine Mont Defies Logic, Suggests it Will Open Late This Year



Before we take the plunge, let me say this: I have no existing quarrel with Shrine Mont. That said, its response to the COVID-19 pandemic is straight out of “Dumb and Dumber.”

In recent communiques, the retreat says it may open late this year, and that it’s following the pandemic closely. Okay fine, but that misses the mark.

Rosslyn, the other diocesan retreat and situs of the bishop’s residence, wisely announced several weeks ago that it is closed for the remainder of the year. And while I recognize that Shrine Mont often is one of the few local jobs available for youth in the area, it needs to close too.

The reality is that we are not in the late stages of the pandemic. We’re not even in the middle stages. Indeed, based on the relatively small percentage of the population infected, we are in the very early stages.

Nor is a vaccine or effective treatment a given. While odds favor both, the reality is that viruses remain potent, nimble foes, with the ability to mutate and otherwise respond to changing medical interventions. And while some Americans are already chafing at stay-at-home directives, viruses are able to play a long waiting game, with degraded forms of viruses even found in mummies.

To make matters worse, church attendance is recognized as a super-spreading event. While I am no fan of the Episcopal Diocese of Virginia and its feckless approach to governance, to its credit the diocese itself recognizes this in its announcements regarding regathering.

The problem with Shrine Mont, however, is that the very things that make it unique and fun are risky. That includes:
  • Communal dining
  • Singing events
  • Sharing rooms
  • Socializing in close quarters and more,
Indeed, even check-in is risky when folks must gather in a hotel lobby, and I cannot see any way that rooms can be sanitized to a level that supports the volume of traffic that Shrine Mont experiences. Indeed, many of the rooms don’t even have adequate distancing between beds and outside windows, given that there is no air conditioning.

Moreover, while there seemingly is little community transmission of the virus in rural areas within Virginia, many of the big churches come from Richmond and NVA, both epicenters of the outbreak. Thus, Shrine Mont runs the risk of bringing clusters of cases into the Shenandoah Valley, with a very real possibility of infecting camp counselors and kitchen staff.

At the end of the day, church remains a super-spreading event, whether it occurs indoors at churches in Northern VA, or at the comparatively rural Shrine Mont. And neither will be safe for clergy and parishioners who are 65+ or who have chronic health diseases any time soon. And the risk of adverse publicity remains great, for a cluster of cases originating at Shrine Mont would garner headlines nationwide, and put the lie to the diocese’s claims of putting the needs of others first.

Then there is the issue of the unknown effects of the disease. With some patients reporting ongoing cognitive difficulties, kidney and lung damage, and inflammatory responses throughout the body, plus the recent deaths of children due to previously unrecognized manifestations of the disease, it’s much too early to think about “nice-to-have” events like Shrine Mont.

To make matters worse, Shrine Mont continues to hold out hope that it will have groups there this summer. But for the reasons referenced above, this is a profoundly bad idea, and the diocese, Susan Goff, and Shrine Mont all make themselves look stupid by hedging their bets.

But then, given that the diocese is okay with Bob Malm’s perjury on the grounds that he did not face criminal charges, and his appalling courtroom conduct, there’s little reason to suspect that it will ultimately act in a particularly ethical manner when it comes to Shrine Mont.

We’ll see.

In the meantime, Shrine Mont needs to do the right thing, quit beating around the bush, and recognize that it simply cannot ensure a reasonable level of safety in the midst of a pandemic.


Thursday, April 30, 2020

Roslyn Retreat Center Closes for Remainder of 2020

The Roslyn Retreat Center, one of two retreat centers owned and operated by the Episcopal Diocese of Virginia, today announced that it is furloughing employees and closing for the remainder of 2020. The move is in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Per remarks for Bishop Susan “It’s Not Misconduct if there are No Criminal Charges” Goff, the news was first relayed to staff at Shrine Mont, which is still debating how best to respond to the pandemic. Curiously, Shrine Mont is currently saying that it will open for the season in late May — prior to the lifting of the governor’s lockdown, and well before the pandemic is predicted to peak in the state.

In Roslyn’s case, news of the closure is not yet posted on the center’s website. I believe, however, in light of the denomination’s aging demographics and the fact that the CDC has deemed worship services and choir practices to be “super spreader” events, that the decision to close is appropriate.

The financial implications of the closures of diocesan-related organizations will be severe. While these organizations will have relatively limited carrying costs, especially with the furloughs, grounds maintenance and other structural expenses continue, regardless of whether they are open or closed. Moreover, while the diocese historically is relatively secretive about the details of its finances, it appears to derive several hundred thousand dollars a year in income from these facilities. That’s important at a time when the diocesan budget is declining on average more than 2% every year.

My guess is that Shine Mont also will close for the year, as there’s simply no way to safely move large groups through, particularly in light of the number of persons who share rooms, and the common dining facilities. But one way or another, the diocese faces some damned rocky times ahead.

Wednesday, April 22, 2020

Demands that Perjuring Priest Bob Malm Be Held Accountable Strengthen as Online Petition Approaches 10,000 Signatures

Petition to Hold Perjruing Priest Bob Malm Accountable

Demands for accountability in the Episcopal Church grow, as my online petition approaches 10,000 signatures. That’s more than the membership of more than 50 church dioceses, and as many signatures as members in the newly re-admittted Diocese of Cuba. The petition demands the the Episcopal Diocese of Virginia conduct a full, fair, and impartial investigation into perjuring priest Bob Malm’s conduct, then act on the results.

The petition is located on change.org and can be found here.

Ironically, addressing Bob’s misconduct, which has brought disrepute on the entire Episcopal Church, is in the best interest of diocese and the larger church. But, as Rhett Butler said to Scarlett O’Hara, “How tightly we clutch the chains that bind us.” Indeed, the diocese and parish continue to try to defend their conduct in court, proving beyond a doubt that both are morally bankrupt. 

The efforts to justify and defend their conduct come, even as parishioners increasingly recognize that Grace Church is in dire trouble, having shed one-third of its pledging units in recent years. Indeed, loss of any further members will require that staff positions — some of the very few controllable costs still left to the parish — be eliminated. Moreover, the church is fast approaching the point where it’s simply no longer able to carrying its existing cost structure, and it must close its doors, offload the physical plant, or merge. 

Simply put, time is running out.

Meanwhile, clergy at the church continue to mislead people about the reality, which is that by and large we are already in the new normal. In other words, this isn’t a storm to be weathered:
  • The recession isn’t going away any time soon.
  •  Job loss will continue for the foreseeable future. 
  • A COVID-19 vaccine isn’t going to be available for at least a year.
So yes, at some point in-person services may resume. But many, especially those at elevated risk due to age and other factors, will continue to avoid attending services on a regular basis. It is also difficult to see how use of the common cup will continue. And changes in giving patterns are unlikely to change for the better.

It’s also worth noting that recent Grace Church publications are sloppy in their references to the current situation. Worship is NOT suspended. Repeat: Worship is NOT suspended. In-person worship is suspended, as was often the days of the early church when it faced persecution. Yet vague references to the suspension of worship in the diocese could well lead someone unfamiliar with the situation to conclude that worship is cancelled until June. Certainly not helpful, and clergy, staff, and volunteers alike need to edit carefully to avoid being sloppy in discussing this issue.

Perhaps when all is said and done, folks at the clergy perjury parish will learn to appreciate the church’s members, instead of concluding that they sit at the right hand of God the father to judge both the quick and the dead, and they can choose who is a member of the parish, and who is not. (Yup, I am talking about Lisa Medley, Alison Campbell, Jan Spence, several others, and the altar guild.)

But then, given the prevailing organizational narcissism, somehow I doubt it. 

In fact, members of Grace Church likely will continue to believe that it’s okay to urge others to commit suicide, to try to drag the dying into court, and for clergy like Bob Malm to commit perjury. After all, the diocese says all of these things are okay, so why should members not follow Susan Goff’s lead?


Tuesday, April 21, 2020

Vienna Presbyterian’s Response to Abuse Markedly Different from that of Susan Goff, DioVA


Some years ago, Vienna Presbyterian faced a scandal involving its youth minister, who allegedly had abused young women in the church. As it struggled to deal with the crisis, the church took an approach profoundly different than that of the Episcopal Diocese of Virginia and Bishop Susan “Perjury’s Okay” Goff.

Shortly after news of the scandal broke, the church received the following directive from its insurance carrier:
“Do not make any statements, orally, in writing or in any manner, to acknowledge, admit to or apologize for anything that may be evidence of or interpreted as (a suggestion that) the actions of Vienna Presbyterian Church ... caused or contributed to any damages arising from the intentional acts/abuse/misconduct” by the youth director.”
The church declined to follow the attorney’s advice, with its board saying in a letter to the church, “Members of Staff and of Session are profoundly sorry that VPC’s response after the abuse was discovered was not always helpful to those entrusted to our care.”

Similarly, Pastor Peter James said in a sermon, “We won’t hide behind lawyers ... Jesus said the truth will set us free.”

Ironically, Bob Malm, in an email to the church vestry, which included his talking points that falsely stated that Mike and I left the church on our own and that our claims were untrue, cited the same Biblical verse, noting that it is “itched” in the church’s rose window.

Today, of course, Grace Church, Susan Goff, and the Diocese continue to try to defend their conduct in court, including their claim that Bob Malm’s perjury is not actionable as a disciplinary matter unless he faces criminal charges.

And that is exactly why the Episcopal Church is nearing its end—with few exceptions, it has lost all claim to moral legitimacy. Instead, it’s all about power, control, and ownership of assets.





Friday, April 3, 2020

Breaking News: Grace Episcopal Alexandria Again Sued

Grace Episcopal Church Claims its Threatened by Domestic Terrorism
Grace Church’s Filing Calling Mom a “Domestic Terrorist”


It’s been a long time coming, but earlier today Mom’s estate filed suit against Grace Church, the diocese, and several named individuals. Due to the state of emergency in Pennsylvania and the closure of the relevant courts, it may be several more days before things are official. But barring the unforeseen, I expect that everything will be complete by May 10.

One of the interesting things in all of this will be seeing how the church explains its claims that Mom defamed it, and why it tried to drag a dying woman into court in violation of state law. Needless to say, I have alerted the news media, and I expect that we’ll see a great deal of additional publicity emerge. 

It should also be interesting to hear explanations from the church as to how Mom’s collective pseudonym, “The Killer B’s,” which she borrowed from Pittsburgh sports teams and her favorite classic rock band, is an act of “domestic terrorism” as claimed by the church in the Pennsylvania courts. In fact, in talking with the clerk of courts in the relevant jurisdiction, it is fair to say that she howled with laughter. 

Hearing folks explain how Mom or someone claiming to be her allegedly repeatedly set up appointments with Bob Malm, only to no-show, should also prove interesting. I fully intend to make the transcripts available to the media.

So, the Episcopal Church has now been sued by a dead woman. Nice.


Wednesday, March 25, 2020

See What A Priest and Attorney Says About Perjuring Priest Bob Malm and Susan Don’t-Get-Arrested Goff

I recently have been in extended discussions with a priest and attorney about the state of affairs at Grace Episcopal, the clergy perjury parish, and the wreck that is the Episcopal Diocese of Virginia under Susan Goff. While I cannot share specifics, one exchange is worth reporting, and reinforces that the Episcopal Church is morally bankrupt.

Read the attached from bottom to top. The photo I included, of Mom in advanced congestive heart failure — at a time when Sugarland Chiow and Bob Malm falsely told the Virginia courts that Mom was up and about and doing fine. Recall that this was in conjunction with their effort to drag Mom into court—an effort that the Pennsylvania courts immediately quashed as illegal, since Sugarland had not, as required by law, obtained advance leave of court.

Sugarland Chiow and perjuring priest Bob Malm — true examples of Jesus’ message of love and compassion. Fully supported by Susan “Don’t Get Arrested” Goff.










Thursday, March 12, 2020

Bishop Goff and COVID-19: A New Wrinkle in the Pandemic


Bishop Susan Goff’s Brand of Christianity: No thanks, you can keep it.

There’s a new wrinkle in the COVID-19 pandemic and the decision to largely shutter churches in The Episcopal Diocese of Virginia for the new two weeks. That is that Bishop Goff is at high risk for the virus, and soon will be at even greater risk.

This issue, of course, is that Goff’s age places her at higher risk of infection.

Even worse, the news that she soon will begin chemotherapy for breast cancer exacerbates the risk. Chemotherapy is, by definition, immunosuppressive, thus compounding her risk profile.

Still worse, much of what Goff does involves crowds. Whether it’s ecclesiastical visits, meetings, or public events, self-isolation will be difficult.

While worrisome, the news may not be all bad. As Goff learns to adapt to a more limited in-person presence, we may see the diocese finally start to take social media seriously. For far too long, the diocese has maintained next to no online presence. Yes, it has a website and Facebook page, but it never engages with external audiences, and it has been years since Goff used her Twitter account. And forget Instagram or other emerging platforms.

It will be interesting to see what happens.

Saturday, March 7, 2020

Diocesan Response to Bob Malm’s Perjury, Misconduct Encourages Abuse, Discourages Reporting




Recently, one of the members of the Roman Catholic Pontifical Commission for the Protection of Minors spoke to media via Skype as she trains church members in Australia to implement more robust measures to protect children from abuse. Her sobering comments hold damning implications for the Episcopal Diocese of Virginia, Susan Goff, and the way that diocesan officials respond to allegations of clergy misconduct.

“If we would expect that with all the guidelines we have in place we can prevent abuse 100 percent, we would be na├»ve,” said Dr. Myriam Wijlens of the Netherlands. “We cannot prevent it in the Church in as much as we cannot prevent it in the Scouts or sports. No system will ever be perfect.”

However, she [said], “we can, and I believe we do, learn to be more attentive, listen and see the signals better and thus improve our reaction. This goes for those in leadership as well as parents and other faithful in the church: we are indeed all more attentive. There is also a better culture that encourages victims to speak and report. The preventive measures will hopefully mean that abusers are not moved and that thus repetitive abuse may be prevented.” (Emphasis added.)

That raises the question: Would any person in his or her right mind go to the diocese with concerns about potential clergy misconduct when the diocese allows retaliation, up to and including perjury on Bob Malm’s part? Would you be comfortable sharing your story with a diocese that is prepared to say that perjury by a priest is only actionable if criminal charges are brought? How do you feel about a church that tries to drag the dying into court?

The answer, of course, is that no one is going to stick their neck out when the diocese responds like this.

The answer becomes even more starkly clear when, as in Bob Malm’s case, the diocese turns a blind eye to breach of confidentiality in the complaint process. Complaints are supposed to be confidential, but the diocese knew and turned a blind eye to Bob Malm’s disclosure of my complaint to Jeff Aaron and others. Yes, it eventually took action, but nothing serious. The fact that Bob Malm doesn’t even adhere to canonically mandated confidentiality should serve as a warning sign to anyone dealing with him, or the diocese itself.

This paradigm has profound implications within the larger Title IV process. Given that clergy occupy the position of perceived power in any complaint situation, parents who for example allege sexual abuse of a child face insurmountable challenges if the diocese is willing to allow retaliation, and turn its back on all clergy misconduct that does not involve criminal charges. Their only option is to get out, and hope that police take their complaints seriously.

In short, the situation with Bob Malm calls into question the entire Title IV system and its ability to address clergy misconduct. Additionally, it makes clear that diocesan officials simply cannot be trusted with issues of this sort.

Read more about the Catholic Church and Dr. Wijlins’ interview here.

Monday, March 2, 2020

BREAKING NEWS: Bishop Susan Goff and Episcopal Church Defend Perjuring Priest Bob Malm in Court




You have to hand it to the Diocese, Bishop Susan Goff and Grace Episcopal. Not only are they morally bankrupt, but they are vigorous in their defense of their right to be morally bankrupt. I mean, where else would you find a church that is litigating to defend a priest who, like Bob Malm, commits perjury, lies repeatedly, tries to subpoena the dying, and more? Even the Catholic Church has moved past the notion that it should defend abusive clergy in court. But in our case, the diocese continues to try to avoid any accountability, as it files a demurrer, claiming inter alia that Bob Malm’s perjury in the previous proceedings and the ethically questionable behavior of counsel Jeff “Sugarland” Chiow, are not sufficient to state a claim of abuse of process.

Of course, in the end there will be accountability. It will come as members increasingly leave the Episcopal Church, as they come to realize that the church has zero claim to moral authority or legitimacy.

My prediction: Given the utter dysfunction in the Episcopal Diocese of Virginia, we will see the rate of decline accelerate within the diocese over the next few years. And why not? If there’s one thing we learned from 30 years of Bob Malm, there is zero need for the ludicrous clericalism associated with having an overpaid professional Christian serving as a “priest.” Paying some 200k a year, with 6 weeks of paid vacation and $100,000 bonuses is simply insane. And that is particularly the case when less than 3 percent of the church budget goes to serving those in need.

Check out the church’s pleading below.


























































































Monday, January 20, 2020

Perjuring Priest Bob Malm Leaves a Parish Bordering on Bankruptcy

While Bob Malm was careful to ensure that he got every last minute of leave and then some coming to him, he was not do diligent in honoring the responsibilities set out in his letter of agreement and in church canons. Whether it was ignoring church canons that require the vestry to elect its officers, the requirement of a finance manual, or even Bob’s facially self-serving “disclosure” on his way out the door that he did not bother to visit most of the parishioners entrusted to his care, Bob was feckless, to say the least.

One of the results is that, in addition to its toxic internal dynamics, concealed beneath an organizationally narcissistic veneer of friendliness, Grace Church is in perilous financial condition.

Current projections — which could change as the last few pledges trickle in — show the parish with 2020 pledges of $723,506, for net income of $872,000. Even with the reduction in payroll resulting from no longer having to pay Bob Malm’s outrageously generous compensation package, that still leaves Grace with perilously thin income, including:

  1. A likely deficit budget, unless the church tries its usual tricks of irrationally inflating projected revenue or irrationally deflating projected expenses, or reduces staff headcount.
  2. The reality that it claims to be a “center for outreach and healing,” yet dramatically underfunds its commitment to the diocese.
  3. The grim reality of paying $70K a year for HVAC repairs — expenses it has known were coming, and for which it should have saved,
  4. Inadequate HVAC in the nave and undercroft, including excess humidity in the latter.
  5. Elevator 1 long overdue for a major overhaul (knowing the church’s spendthrift propensities, some ding-a-ling likely will push to waste money by replacing the whole thing,)
  6. Failing rake boards, thermopane windows, and a faux slate roof from the 1997 renovations.
  7. A parking lot with paving beyond actuarial end of life.
  8. Energy inefficient lighting throughout the building, including parking lot lights likely to fail within the next few years.
  9. A shortened life expectancy on the condensing boilers due to lack of maintenance.
  10. Failing hot water heaters due to lack of maintenance.
  11. Lack of current ADA features, including compliant internal directional signage and electro-mechanical entrance systems.
  12. Local outreach amounting to just 3 percent of budget.
  13. Ongoing problems with rodents, particularly in classroom and food preparation areas.
  14. An antiquated commercial kitchen.
Moreover, in a classic sign of a dying church, a plummeting number of remaining pledging units is attempting to shore things up by increasing their giving, leaving the church highly vulnerable to even the loss of a few pledging units. As things stand, when adjusted for inflation, Grace Church has lost 1/3 of its income since 2008, even as it paid Bob Malm a $100,000 bonus, no doubt for his exemplary work performance. Meanwhile, more than half its pledging units have fled the church.

And to top it all off, the layers of unresolved conflict in the church now are largely irreparable, with my situation now no longer capable of repair. Having offered the church and diocese multiple opportunities to resolve our differences, that option is now off the table. After all, the very definition of madness is doing the same thing over and over, while expecting a different result. So I am not wasting any time on the hypocrites of The Episcopal Church. 

Here, in visual format, is where things stand, thanks to 30 years of perjuring priest Bob Malm:


Tuesday, December 31, 2019

Reflections as We Enter the Final Days of the 2020 Pledge Season





As we get ready to move into a new year, the Grace Church vestry has the unenviable task of preparing the parish’s 2020 budget. Similarly, members may be contemplating year-end gifts to the church. With those factors in mind, here are my thoughts on those issues.

On the one hand, the parish now is free of the deleterious effect of perjuring priest Bob Malm, at least on a daily basis. Michael Guy appears to be much more grounded in actual faith, and less in outward image.

That said, the church has yet to make peace with its past and Bob’s baleful influence. This is still a spendthrift church—one that pays $100k bonuses to a feckless rector, while cutting employee health benefits. A church that refuses to save for the future. A church that does next to nothing to grow, yet expects membership to miraculously increase. A church that claims to be a center for “outreach and healing,” yet puts very little money toward these goals. A church that tries to drag the dying into court, where members urge people to commit suicide, and where the rector commits perjury with impunity. In fact, the church named part of the building after its former Perjurer in Chief. A church that has to borrow to keep the HVAC on, but draws $3,000 out of savings for a party.

Even better, the church has the chutzpah to claim that it’s been careful with its funds. Leaving aside $100,000 bonuses and the more than $2 million cost to the church of Bob Malm’s personally owned rathole of a house, I guess that’s true. After all, those expenses don’t leave room for much else.

All of that points to a larger issue, which is how much longer will people provide funding for this toxic mess? The fact that Bob Malm can commit perjury with the full support of the vestry, Sugarland Chiow, the staff, and the diocese, then get part of the building named after him for his troubles, demonstrates that this is a church and denomination that is utterly broken and dysfunctional. Yes, the optimists among us think some of these issues will be addressed in another generation, but collapsing attendance, baptisms, and other indices of church health suggest that neither the denomination nor the parish have another generation during which to fiddle with the deck chairs.

If we look at Europe and the role of organized religion there, it seems unlikely that church ever will make a comeback. Once-bitten, twice shy applies, and this is a dog that’s bitten far too often to get any benefit of the doubt.

So, if you are a member of Grace Church, or of the Club Mayo crowd, my message to you is this: It is time for radical change. And if you can’t or won’t make that happen, it’s time to say goodbye. Grace Church, the diocese, and the Episcopal Church simply are no longer relevant.

And as the vestry plans for 2020, I’m here to tell you that more of the same isn’t going to work. No one wants to subsidize the lifestyles of the rich and famous, let alone the perjurious.


Wednesday, December 18, 2019

Breaking News: Grace Episcopal Lawsuit Moves Forward



Earlier today, the Alexandria General District court heard my motion to compel. It also received various motions from Diane DiBlasio, the attorney for Grace Episcopal, the Episcopal Diocese of Virginia, and Bishop Susan Goff. The defense motions included a motion to dismiss with prejudice and a motion requesting a bill of particulars. The latter sets forth the reasons a plaintiff believes she or he has a legal cause of action.

The only motion on which the court ruled was the request to schedule a bill of particulars. Thus, I will be filing that pleading by the end of January, the defense will file its response by the end of February, and we will hold the next hearing in March.

Afterwards, I had a moment to chat with Diane, who is very professional and capable. My heads-up to her, which I hope informs her efforts and those of her clients, centers around Bob Malm’s perjury during the discovery phrase of my appeal. (Recall that Bob falsely claimed that my mom, or someone purporting to be her, “time after time” contacted him. This he cited as a primary reason he believed mom’s blog to really be mine.)

So, it will be interesting to see if the diocese, Bishop Goff, and Grace Episcopal want to defend Bob Malm’s perjury. That said, if past performance is any indicator, all three will do their utmost to defend his conduct.

It’s also interesting that defense counsel attempted to assert that this is an internal ecclesiastical matter. With the parish having taken the matter to court in the first place, it is difficult to conclude that this indeed is not subject to judicial review. That said, in fairness to defense counsel, she had little to go on.

Bob Malm, perjuring priest.

Grace Episcopal, the clergy perjury parish.

Monday, December 9, 2019

Just Like the Episcopal Diocese of Virginia and Bob Malm, Church Ignored Warning Signs in Brian Boucher Case



Before we go further, let me say up front: To my knowledge, Bob Malm is not accused of any form of sexual impropriety.

That said, the case of convicted Canadian pedophile priest Brian Boucher sounds alarmingly similar to my experiences with Bob Malm and the Episcopal Diocese of Virginia, both in terms of Boucher’s manipulative, possibly sociopathic, behavior and the diocese’s efforts to avoid dealing with the real issues. Indeed, in Boucher’s case, the diocese appears to have taken the matter more seriously than has the Episcopal Diocese of Virginia, for the former at least spent time and effort addressing the more obvious signs that Boucher was maladjusted.

In reviewing the Boucher media coverage, the first thing one notices is Boucher’s attention to his physical appearance. Even when headed to jail, Boucher consistently looks put together and carefully pressed. This is very similar to Bob Malm, who often appears inordinately consumed with keeping his SUV clean and polished, his tan, his hair color, and even his efforts to conceal his hair loss via transplants.

Then one transitions to Boucher’s conduct, in which, much like Bob Malm, he attempts to manipulate the world around him to suit his needs. Those of importance to him get attention and flattery, while those unimportant to him get ignored. Similarly, those who expressed concern about Boucher’s conduct found themselves denied access to the church and rectory buildings. Indeed, Boucher attempted to fire one parish employee who spoke out, and multiple families left Boucher’s parish, rather than comply with his manipulative behavior. Such conduct is strikingly similar to that of Bob Malm, even down to trying to deny access to the church building to critics.

Similarly, critics feared Boucher’s temper, which sounds suspiciously like the classic narcissistic rage. Boucher’s attempts at domination and control, much like Malm’s behavior, also seem to witnesses to be antithetical to his alleged calling as a priest.

Then we read about Boucher’s divisive conduct, in which he surrounds himself with a circle of loyalists who protect him and alert him to criticism from within the parish. Again, very similar to Bob Malm.

Turning to the diocese, we see that time and again officials turned a blind eye to the myriad warning signs of trouble. Yes, the church may have spent considerable time and trouble to deal with Boucher’s controlling behavior, but it never was willing to delve further into the issues, including assessing root causes behind the behavior. Indeed, even prior to ordination, those who feared Boucher was unsuited to the priesthood were ignored and brushed off.

This sounds very much like Bob Malm, where some parishioners, even as early as his calling to the church in Portsmouth NH, appear to have recognized that something was not right. For example, when Bob was in New Hampshire, one parishioner allegedly ran for vestry solely in order to see what Bob was “going to do to my church.”  While seemingly innocuous and easily dismissed, that sort of gut reaction to Bob should have been a warning sign.

Similarly, the ongoing flight of pledging units and the departure of numerous former leaders from Grace Church should be more than a warning sign to the Episcopal Diocese of Virginia; it should be the equivalent of Cheyenne Mountain’s air raid siren blaring in the night. People don’t pack up and leave a church in which they’re invested for trivial reasons. Instead, when they leave in droves, it’s because something is seriously wrong.

Will the church vestry and the diocese ever comprehend the real issues here? I doubt it. Between thirty years of Bob’s manipulative behavior, the organizational narcissism in the parish, and the inconvenience that would come with addressing Bob Malm’s misconduct, there is little reason for optimism.

For more on Boucher and the church’s attempt to avoid dealing with the real issues, visit the CBC’s investigative report at https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/montreal/brian-boucher-history-investigation-1.5383177.

Tuesday, November 26, 2019

Online Court Case Information

Someone recently asked how they could access independent information on the court case now pending against Grace Episcopal Alexandria, Bishop Susan Goff, and the Episcopal Diocese of Virginia in conjunction with Bob Malm’s perjury. 


I will provide information on the other court cases as they are filed.




Monday, November 25, 2019

Grace Episcopal, the Clergy Perjury Parish



Response: Why Does the Diocese Defend Bob Malm and His Perjury?

The Episcopal Diocese of Virginia: Mad Men Revisited

Someone recently asked me why the Episcopal Diocese of Virginia continues to defend Bob Malm, his perjury, and Grace Episcopal’s attempts to game the legal system. Of course, only the diocese knows for sure, but I believe I know why.

In large measure, it’s the same paradigm, I believe, as led diocesan officials to support Bishop Bruno, despite clear evidence he’d behaved badly on multiple occasions. Specifically, trust in people known to the diocese, combined with arrogance, complacency, and a psychological paradigm in which questioning one’s preconceived notions intertwines with fear of questioning one’s faith. On top of that, there’s evidence to suggest that diocesan chancellor, JP Causey, gives folks bad legal advice, in which he urges diocesan officials to take a hands-off approach in order to minimize potential liability, despite canonical requirements to the contrary and larger ethical issues. And there’s the gut instinct to protect the institution at all costs, even when doing so actually results in lasting damage.

Of course, it is this same confluence of factors that leads churches to ignore sexual abuse. The Catholic church has been handling issues this way for decades, with predictably disastrous results. And the church adheres to a Madmen-era definition of abuse: Unless it involves children or sex, it doesn’t count.

At the same time, the one thing that can be said for the vestry at Grace church and the diocese is that Christianity has nothing to do with their conduct. Even a rudimentary review of the evidence would make clear that Bob Malm misused the legal system, lied to the courts, and committed perjury during discovery. But the diocese doesn’t want to go there, as doing so would uncover these inconvenient truths. And parishioners continue with their laughable, “Bob Malm wouldn’t do that,” routine.

In short, no matter how things play out in court, it’s important to realize that this situation illustrates a larger truth, which is that there is simply nothing Christian about the diocese of Virginia or its officials. Yes, there are churches in the diocese that do hold to a real faith, but they face profound challenges when they send money to an utterly broken and corrupt diocese.

So, if you are looking for real Christian faith, my advice is to look elsewhere. Otherwise, you may wind up wasting a lot of time, money and energy on an utterly illusory situation.